International Working Animal Day

Around the world, millions of working animals do the jobs of trucks, tractors and taxis every day, with the average animal working more than 56 hours a week.


For our fourth annual International Working Animal Day, we’re highlighting the fact that working animals and their owners have no choice but to work for their entire lives – luxuries like retirement and holidays are not an option.

Morocco donkeys drinking water

International Working Animal Day

How hard do you work?

On International Working Animal Day, find out how your working life – including how many tea breaks you’ll take and how many hours you’ll spend commuting to your job – compares to that of a working animal overseas.
Male
Female

So how does your working life compare?

In wealthier countries, people’s working lives have been changed dramatically in the past generation by things like evolving technology and employment rights. But working animals endure the same conditions they faced a century ago – including long working hours in often dangerous conditions, few breaks and no days off. SPANA believes that these animals deserve greater recognition – and that a life of work shouldn’t mean a life of suffering.
Years left to work
000 Years
000 Years
Working animals work their entire lives and, like their owners, never get to retire
Total holiday days taken over a working life
000 Years
000 Years
There are no holidays for working animals, which work day-in, day-out, like the families they support
Total hours commuted over your working life
000 Years
000 Years
Working animals must walk many miles every day carrying heavy loads
Total tea breaks taken over a working life
000 Years
000 Years
Working animals work tirelessly and don’t stop for regular breaks whenever they choose
Donate to SPANA to help the world’s working animals